Posts Tagged 'Roskamp Institute'

Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer Research Offers Invaluable Insights On The Disease

Millions of people across the globe suffer from Alzheimer’s disease. It is estimated (Alzheimer’s Association, 2008) that in every 71 seconds someone from the US develops Alzheimer’s disease, and estimations by mid-century shows that the probability of someone developing Alzheimer’s disease is every 33 seconds. At present, there are approximately 5.2 million Americans in all age groups who suffer from Alzheimer’s disease; and 13% of these patients fall in the age category of 65 years and older. It is calculated that by 2050 the number of Alzheimer’s patients falling in the age category of 65 years and older will increase to a range of over 11 million to 16 million alone (Alzheimer’s Association, 2008). The facts and figures are alarming and bring our focus to the unmet demand for effective therapeutics and new researches for treatments related to Alzheimer’s disease.
Dr. Michael Mullan is an accredited professional from biomedical field. He has extensively researched on the causes and prospective cures of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative disorders conditions. Based in Sarasota, Florida, he is reputed Director of Roskamp Institute. He is a highly qualified professional and has dedicated his time to finding cures for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and addictions. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research work has provided invaluable insights on the disease with which many potential cures have been developed and tested. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research indicates that one of the causes directly related to the disease is the excess accumulation of beta-amyloid, a type of protein, present in the brain. It was estimated that the protein is produced in every human but its excess accumulation can result in Alzheimer’s. Besides, Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research continuously tests medications and therapeutic treatments to help slow down the accumulation of beta-amyloid and related inflammation in patients.
About Dr Michael Mullan
Dr Michael Mullan has been working in the biomedical field for many years. He is a leading researcher with special expertise in assessment of the earliest cognitive symptoms and stages of Alzheimer’s disease. Mullan’s Alzheimer research works are also published in various articles which help students and researchers for making new discoveries. Find out more about his Alzheimer research works, by browsing through http://www.rfdn.org or http://www.mullanalzheimer.com or http://www.mullanalzheimer.info.

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Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer Research Identified Various Genetic Variations

Based in Sarasota, Florida, The Roskamp Institute is a not-for-profit organization. It has dedicated time to finding cures for several neuropsychiatric disorders with a special emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In order to develop therapeutic targets which are specific to Alzheimer’s disease etiology, the scientists engaged in current research at Roskamp Institute focus on dissecting the molecular biological pathways which are associated in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis.
Dr. Michael Mullan is the Director of the Roskamp Institute, and along with his team, he discovered the concept of ‘Swedish mutation’, a genetic error which results in overproduction of beta-amyloid by aberrant proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP). The concept of Swedish mutation now forms the bases of most mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease. Many tests and findings by the Roskamp Institute resulted in several therapeutic prospects for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease as well as Cancer.
The Roskamp Institute has contributed greatly by providing research on the treatments of several neuropsychiatric disorders like traumatic brain injury, substance abuse, and Alzheimer, etc. With the guidance and knowledge provided by Dr. Mullan, the institute tested many causes and correlations between Alzheimer’s disease and proteins present in human brain. With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, several types of genetic variations, which can be the cause of Alzheimer’s, have been identified. It was discovered that the central reason to the disease process is a small protein identified as the ß (beta)-amyloid. Although, this protein is present normally in the human brain, but at times excess or abnormal accumulation can result in Alzheimer’s disease. With Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research, the institute tests cutting edge cures, therapeutic treatments and medications to slow down the process of toxic ß-amyloid accumulation.
Dr Mullan’s Alzheimer research proves that Aβ peptide prevents blood vessel growth and eventually inhibits tumor growth in brain. To identify if Aβ has the same effect with short derivatives, he studied various sequences within the Alzheimer’s Aβ peptide which have potential therapeutic relevance in preventing tumor growth. Dr. Mullan’s Alzheimer research work has contributed exceptionally to the field to help understand the disease and find its cures. Find out more about his Alzheimer research works, by browsing through http://www.rfdn.org or http://www.mullanalzheimer.com or http://www.mullanalzheimer.info.

Family History of Alzheimer’s disease – what does it mean?

Frequently in the Roskamp institute Memory Clinic we are asked what a family history of Alzheimer’s disease means for the children and other blood relatives of sufferers. Although this question is always handled on an individual basis there are some general guidelines that can be offered to access risk for the disease to children and other family members related to a sufferer. Naturally, family members who perceive they are at risk for developing the disease themselves may suffer from a great degree of anxiety it is therefore important to ask the staff at the Roskamp Institute what the individual risk is for developing the disease. In general the genetic risk for Alzheimer’s disease can be divided into two categories; early onset familial disease which is highly genetic and occurs in families which may have onsets of the disease in the 40s,50s or 60s; late onset disease which is frequently familial but where the disease onsets in the seventh decade onwards. We shall consider these two scenarios separately.

Early onset Alzheimer’s disease.

The term “early onset Alzheimer’s” is frequently misunderstood or used in a confusing way. What we generally mean by early onset Alzheimer’s is Alzheimer’s that onsets before the age to 60 years. This is in contrast to the term early onset as referencing the early stage of the disease. This is a confusing way to use the term and is discouraged. Early stage disease is a better term to describe the early phases of the disease. Early onset familial disease occurs in families that are affected in multiple generations by mutations in genes that can trigger the disease. Families of early onset disease thankfully are very rare but they have provided great insight into the disease process probably in all cases of the disease (early and late onset). Sadly, frequently in these families the disease is inherited in what is known as an autosomal dominant fashion. Autosomal dominant inheritance means that 50% of the offspring of each generation on average are impacted by the disease. Some generations may be very fortunate and although they may be at risk for inheriting the diseased gene from one or the other parent none of the siblings in a sibship may be affected. On the contrary sibships can be very unlucky in which case more than 50% are impacted with the disease. For each child of an affected parent there is a 50% chance of inheriting the disease and this chance is not influenced by whether other siblings have already inherited the disease or not.

Unfortunately the inheritance of these rare genetic variance means that individuals at risk are highly likely to develop the disease if they live long enough. One of the important characteristics of these familial mutations is that the disease tends to onset around approximately the same time of life. Thus if a family has a mean (average) age of onset of 52 and one inherits one of these rare generic errors then one is unlikely to live to 60 without developing signs or symptoms of the disease. By contrast if one does not carry the mutation then there is no more risk for the disease than the general population.

Again it is most important to emphasize that such families are extremely rare and early onset Alzheimer’s is not the most likely reason for patients or their families to visit the Roskamp Institute Clinic. In fact, approximately 1% or less of cases of Alzheimer’s Disease have what can be described as early onset disease. In the past, individuals who come from such families have sought genetic counseling including genetic testing for these genetic errors. It is relatively straightforward to detect such errors but clearly the genetic information is highly sensitive. Family members should therefore think very carefully before seeking such information however initially finding out more about early onset disease is a recommended step.

Clinicians at the Roskamp Institute are happy to discuss early onset disease with patients and their families as they wish. Finally it should be noted that many cases of early onset disease occur without a family history. Thus individuals can manifest the disease before the age of 60 but have no other known family members either in the prior generations or in subsequent generations that develop the disease the cause of early onset Alzheimer’s that is not familial is not well understood but importantly there is no risk to subsequent family members for development of the disease.

Late onset (common) Alzheimer’s disease. Much more commonly patients and their families come to the clinic at the Roskamp Institute and seek advice on the inheritance of Alzheimer’s when one or more members of the family has late onset disease. This is defined as disease which onsets over the age of 60 and this is by far in a way the most common cause of the disease. It is estimated that approximately 4 million Americans presently either have the disease or are in the early or pre clinical stages – most of these cases are late onset Alzheimer’s Disease. The predicted numbers for future disease prevalence are very high. For instance it is estimated that by mid century there could be as many as two hundred million individuals afflicted with the disease.

Most late onset Alzheimer’s disease does not exhibit a clear autosomal dominant pattern meaning that the risk to offspring of individuals suffering with the disease is usually considerably less than 50%. Certain genetic risk factors for late onset disease have been identified – the most important of which is apolipoprotein E (APOE). There are 3 common forms of APOE: E2, E3 and E4. The discovery by Allen Roses and his colleagues at Duke University showed that Alzheimer’s disease sufferers were much more likely to carry one or two copies of the E4 allele (genetic form) of APOE than the normal population. Carrying one copy of APOE 4 increases ones risk for the disease by approximately three times and carrying two copies can increase the risk for the disease by up to fifteen times compared to individuals who do not carry an APOE 4 allele.

Many family members express interest in being genetically tested for their risk for the disease. Such tests are commercially available but most centers discourage the use of testing prior to symptoms because many individuals who carry an APOE 4 allele do not necessarily develop the disease at least until late old age. Conversely it’s very possible to develop Alzheimer’s disease without carrying an APOE 4 allele. Therefore on an individual basis the test is not overly helpful in specifying who may or may not develop the disease. However on a group basis APOE genetic testing is very helpful to give an average estimate of the numbers of individuals who will subsequently develop Alzheimer’s.

It is anticipated that as better treatments are available for Alzheimer’s disease there will be greater interest in genetic testing. For instance it is expected that as treatments are used earlier and earlier in the stages of the disease that individuals in the very early stage or maybe with no symptoms at all might seek medical treatment once such treatment has been established as effective in stopping the rate of progression or disease onset.

Despite the fact that genetic testing is not used frequently in clinical practice it is a tremendous tool in assisting researchers in understanding when and why the diseases develops and in planning clinical trials to take into account who is most likely to develop the disease. Already there is evidence from several clinical trials that individuals that carry the APOE 4 allele may be more refractory to certain treatments. As drug development progresses it will be important to develop medications that are able to tackle the severest form of the disease i.e. those patients who are carrying and APOE 4 allele.

Summary: The two types of familial Alzheimer’s disease differ in the risk for offspring of developing the disease. The early onset cases as noted have children that are highly at risk for developing the disease if there is a family history. By contrast late onset disease or low clustering in families is much less genetically predisposed. In both cases genetic tests are available but are generally discouraged particularly for late onset disease. Roskamp Institute researchers and clinicians are well versed in the genetic aspects of the disease and can advise on an individual or family basis as required.

The Roskamp Institute is a not-for-profit research Institute located in Sarasota and Tampa, Florida, that is dedicated to understanding the causes of, and finding cures for, neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and addictions with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease. The Institute’s Memory Clinics also offer comprehensive cognitive and medical assessment toward differential diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease and offers treatments and disease management options once the diagnostic evaluation is complete.

By Dr. Michael Mullan, Director of Alzheimer Research Institute, The Roskamp Institute

for more information on Alzheimer’s please visit:

http://www.mullanalzheimer.com

http://www.mullanalzheimer.info

Why work with Alzheimer’s disease patients?

Walking into the Memory Disorder Clinic at the Roskamp Institute one might ask “Why work with Alzheimer’s patients and their families?” The answers are manyfold. One of the most rewarding aspects of working with Alzheimer’s patients is that they are most commonly our oldest citizens who have 60, 70 or 80 years of life experience behind them many of them have served their country in one form or another – frequently in the military but often times in businesses working for others or their own companies. Many of those serving in the armed forces have captivating stories. One visitor to the clinic had parachuted into three war zones Normandy, the “boot” of Italy, and Germany. Remembering this tale this gentleman was most afraid of being shot by the Russians! Of course being able to recall these old memories is not unusual for Alzheimer disease suffers. In fact the tendency to reminisce sometimes becomes a prominent feature of the disorder. Most caregivers are initially concerned by another aspect of the disorder namely the forgetfulness for recently acquired or presented information. Such things as recent visits recent phone calls or recent conversations and events may not be remembered either in part or in full. This distressing symptom interferes with social activities and is a progressive aspect of the disease. Therefore one of the most rewarding aspect of working with Alzheimer’s sufferers and their families is being able to convey to them the several treatment options that are available. This includes, as well as those drugs approved by the FDA, new and experimental treatments including those that are being developed by the Roskamp Institute itself.

Providing hope for patients and their families is a critical part of interfacing with them. In addition helping families to come to terms with a disorder that can impact many aspects of their love ones’ lives (including social interactions, pastimes and sports, financial transactions and medical legal issues) enables families to make the necessary adjustments to deal with the condition. Naturally a particularly satisfying interaction can occur when certain elements of a patient’s health can be altered to improve the outcome once a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s has been made. For instance we know that cardio-vascular health interacts critically with Alzheimer’s disease and aversion of cerebrovascular events (such as small strokes or transient ischemic attacks) has a highly beneficial effect on the outcome of Alzheimer’s patients. In addition other conditions such as diabetes or thyroid disease can interact negatively with the disease. These and many other treatable causes of cognitive dysfunction appear at the Roskamp Memory Clinic and are regularly amenable to intervention. Sometimes previous diagnoses are found to be incorrect and memory loss may be completely reversible. For instance people suffering from normal pressure hydrocephalus have a condition that is completely amenable to surgical correction.

Another gratifying aspect of working with Alzheimer’s patients is being able to give their families and loved ones a clear indication of what the treatment options are and what the outcomes are likely to be. In addition family members are often concerned about their own risk for developing the disease it now being common knowledge that the disease has a familial aspect.

All in all there is much to recommend a profession working and caring for Alzheimer’s patients. Our elderly are frequently amongst our most valued citizens who have contributed to the prosperity and safety of subsequent generations. Continuing to work for their immediate care and finding new treatments to improve their long term prognosis are the premier interests of the Roskamp Institute’s researchers, physicians and clinicians.

Roskamp Institute Gulf War Illness research program

Dr. Crawford presented the Roskamp Institute Gulf War Illness research program to the Research Advisory Committee on Gulf War veterans illnesses on June 28-29th at the Veterans Administration in Washington, DC. Her presentation included details of genomic and proteomic analyses of laboratory models of exposure to agents that have been implicated in GWI, which is targeted toward identification of plasma biomarkers and molecular targets for therapeutic intervention. Other speakers included Captain Melissa Kaime, M.D., Director of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Program, Dr. William Goldberg, Scientific Program Manager for the VA Office of Research and Development, and Mr. John Gingrich, Chief of Staff at the Department of Veterans Affairs. The Committee is chaired by Mr. James Binns, a former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, and a Vietnam veteran. Other committee members include Dr. Floyd Bloom, Professor Emeritus of the Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Kimberly Sullivan of Boston University School of Public Health and Scientific Coordinator for the Committee, and Mr. Anthony Hardie, Executive Assistant of the Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs, and a Gulf War and Somalia veteran.

Event: Journal Club “The effect of encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells on brain amyloid load and behavioral impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease"

Nowell (Jim) Ganey will be presenting the paper on Friday (6/25/2010) at Roskamp Institute.

Title:The effect of encapsulated VEGF-secreting cells on brain amyloid load and behavioral impairment in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease.

Journal : Biomaterials.

2010 Jul;31(21):5608-18. Epub 2010 Apr 28.

Journal Club is held every Friday between 4 Pm-5pm. For change in schedule please check our twitter account or facebook page.

The Roskamp Institute is devoted to understanding causes and finding cures for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and addictions. The Institute utilizes a broad range of scientific approaches to understanding the causes of and potential therapies for these disorders with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, please call (941)752-2949


News:Nomination for Business/Education Partnership Award through the School District of Manatee County's ePIE program

The Roskamp Institute has been nominated for a Business/Education Partnership Award through the School District of Manatee County‘s ePIE program. Since 1990, this awards program recognizes businesses, organizations, and individuals who have made the commitment to work together to enhance education in the School District of Manatee County. The awards ceremony will be held in August.  Last year 2009  the Roskamp Institute won a Business/Education partnership award for its work with South East High School.

The Roskamp Institute is devoted to understanding causes and finding cures for neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and addictions. The Institute utilizes a broad range of scientific approaches to understanding the causes of and potential therapies for these disorders with an emphasis on Alzheimer’s disease. For more information, please call (941)752-2949