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Roskamp Institute Research notes cancer video

Here’s is a video about Aβ and cancer.

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Roskamp Institute Research notes cancer video

Here’s is a video about Aβ and cancer.

Roskamp Institute Research notes cancer video

Here’s is a video about Aβ and cancer.

Research Notes in Alzheimer – Mullan comments about: DHPs mechanism of action

Research at the Roskamp Institute shows that certain antihypertensive drugs could lower the Alzheimer Abeta amyloid peptide by two mechanisms: reduced production and increasing the clearance across the blood brain barrier. The recent paper by researchers at the Roskamp Institute with first author Dr. Daniel Paris and senior author Dr. Michael Mullan demonstrates that certain antihypertensive drugs may confer protection against the development of Alzheimer’s disease. These particular antihypertensive drugs are from a class of chemicals called dihydropyridines (DHPs). Large population based studies suggest that not all DHPs are helpful in preventing Alzheimer’s disease; but, some give a clear signal that that is the case. Drs. Paris, Mullan, and colleagues show that the reason for this may be that certain DHPs can lower the production of the Alzheimer amyloid peptide. In addition, they show that these compounds are able to increase the clearance of amyloid across the blood brain barrier. In studies of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (which develop Alzheimer-like pathology with amyloid deposition SAH) these DHPs can lower the accumulation of amyloid. The effect of reduction in the accumulation of amyloid is to allow animals to continue to learn and memorize new information.

The Roskamp Institute, with their colleagues in Dublin, Ireland and elsewhere in Europe, have taken one of these drugs, Nilvadapine, into clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease. Under the leadership of Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford, the Roskamp Institute is dedicated to finding new treatments and cures for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

Mol Med. 2011 Mar-Apr;17(3-4):149-62.
Selective antihypertensive dihydropyridines lower A! accumulation by
targeting both the production and the clearance of A! across the blood-brain
barrier.
Paris D, Bachmeier C, Patel N, Quadros A, Volmar CH, Laporte V, Ganey J, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Ait-Ghezala G, Crawford F, Mullan M.

For more information Please visit:
<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid

Research Notes in Alzheimer – Mullan comments about: DHPs mechanism of action

Research at the Roskamp Institute shows that certain antihypertensive drugs could lower the Alzheimer Abeta amyloid peptide by two mechanisms: reduced production and increasing the clearance across the blood brain barrier. The recent paper by researchers at the Roskamp Institute with first author Dr. Daniel Paris and senior author Dr. Michael Mullan demonstrates that certain antihypertensive drugs may confer protection against the development of Alzheimer’s disease. These particular antihypertensive drugs are from a class of chemicals called dihydropyridines (DHPs). Large population based studies suggest that not all DHPs are helpful in preventing Alzheimer’s disease; but, some give a clear signal that that is the case. Drs. Paris, Mullan, and colleagues show that the reason for this may be that certain DHPs can lower the production of the Alzheimer amyloid peptide. In addition, they show that these compounds are able to increase the clearance of amyloid across the blood brain barrier. In studies of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (which develop Alzheimer-like pathology with amyloid deposition SAH) these DHPs can lower the accumulation of amyloid. The effect of reduction in the accumulation of amyloid is to allow animals to continue to learn and memorize new information.

The Roskamp Institute, with their colleagues in Dublin, Ireland and elsewhere in Europe, have taken one of these drugs, Nilvadapine, into clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease. Under the leadership of Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford, the Roskamp Institute is dedicated to finding new treatments and cures for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

Mol Med. 2011 Mar-Apr;17(3-4):149-62.
Selective antihypertensive dihydropyridines lower A! accumulation by
targeting both the production and the clearance of A! across the blood-brain
barrier.
Paris D, Bachmeier C, Patel N, Quadros A, Volmar CH, Laporte V, Ganey J, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Ait-Ghezala G, Crawford F, Mullan M.

For more information Please visit:
<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid

Research Notes in Alzheimer – Mullan comments about: DHPs mechanism of action

Research at the Roskamp Institute shows that certain antihypertensive drugs could lower the Alzheimer Abeta amyloid peptide by two mechanisms: reduced production and increasing the clearance across the blood brain barrier. The recent paper by researchers at the Roskamp Institute with first author Dr. Daniel Paris and senior author Dr. Michael Mullan demonstrates that certain antihypertensive drugs may confer protection against the development of Alzheimer’s disease. These particular antihypertensive drugs are from a class of chemicals called dihydropyridines (DHPs). Large population based studies suggest that not all DHPs are helpful in preventing Alzheimer’s disease; but, some give a clear signal that that is the case. Drs. Paris, Mullan, and colleagues show that the reason for this may be that certain DHPs can lower the production of the Alzheimer amyloid peptide. In addition, they show that these compounds are able to increase the clearance of amyloid across the blood brain barrier. In studies of transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease (which develop Alzheimer-like pathology with amyloid deposition SAH) these DHPs can lower the accumulation of amyloid. The effect of reduction in the accumulation of amyloid is to allow animals to continue to learn and memorize new information.

The Roskamp Institute, with their colleagues in Dublin, Ireland and elsewhere in Europe, have taken one of these drugs, Nilvadapine, into clinical trials for Alzheimer’s disease. Under the leadership of Drs. Michael Mullan and Fiona Crawford, the Roskamp Institute is dedicated to finding new treatments and cures for Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders.

Mol Med. 2011 Mar-Apr;17(3-4):149-62.
Selective antihypertensive dihydropyridines lower A! accumulation by
targeting both the production and the clearance of A! across the blood-brain
barrier.
Paris D, Bachmeier C, Patel N, Quadros A, Volmar CH, Laporte V, Ganey J, Beaulieu-Abdelahad D, Ait-Ghezala G, Crawford F, Mullan M.

For more information Please visit:
<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid

A paper released by the Roskamp Institute from lead researchers Drs. Fiona Crawford and Michael Mullan details their efforts to find blood biomarkers of traumatic brain injury.

Mullan Alzheimer Research Institute Roskamp Institute aids high school students in genetic research

Dr. Mullan Alzheimer Research Institute helps high school student to be involved in research………

Roskamp Institute aids high school students in genetic research

Roskamp aids high school students in genetic research

By JENNIFER RICH – jrich

They look like scientists in their white coats, working in the Roskamp Institute’s lab using microscopes and high-tech research equipment.

But they’re high school students doing genetic research just like the adults working alongside.

It’s probably the best hands-on learning experience in the world for teens who hope to major in fields like chemical engineering and organic chemistry when they go to college, says James Humphrey, chief operating officer at Roskamp.

Read more: http://www.bradenton.com/2011/11/14/3649043/bridging-the-gap.html#ixzz1dgyk7Niz

For more information Please visit:
<a href=’http://www.rfdn.org‘>http://www.rfdn.org</a>
<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.com‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.com</a>

<a href=’http://www.mullanalzheimer.info‘>http://www.mullanalzheimer.info</a>

michael mullan, alzheimer, mullan alzheimer, mullan roskamp, roskamp institute, amyloid